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China’s sinking stock market reached an unwelcome milestone, with the Shanghai Composite Index closing at the lowest level since 2014, erasing the last traces of its recovery from a boom that turned into a $5 trillion bust.The second China International Import Expo will be held at the National Exhibition and Convention Center in Shanghai from November 5 to 10, 2019.For further information about China International Import Expo, please visit: https://www.shine.cn/China-International-Import-Expo/.Find the latest breaking shanghai news, photos, videos and featured stories on shanghai composite index. SHINE provides trusted national and world news as well as local and regional perspectives.

The Shanghai gauge dropped 1.1 percent to 2,651.79, below its January 2016 bottom. Back then, officials had just introduced and then hastily scrapped a disastrous circuit-breaker program as they grappled with one of the market’s worst-ever routs.

Trade tensions with the US are exacerbating investor concern. With President Donald Trump telling aides to proceed with additional tariffs on Chinese products, the Chinese government is considering declining an offer of talks, according to a Wall Street Journal report, which cited officials with knowledge of the discussions.It’s hard to buy Chinese stocks even if they sell down" given the trade war and weak company fundamentals, said Toshihiko Takamoto, a Singapore-based money manager at Asset Management One. "Even if the valuation gets cheaper, there’s a reason for that. It’s hard to find factors that would spark a sharp rebound."

A weaker yuan also makes the nation’s shares less attractive. China’s currency has fallen almost 7 percent since the end of March amid speculation the government was trying to counter the impact of U.S. tariffs.This year’s hefty declines -- the Shanghai gauge is down 20 percent in 2018 -- ends a period of relative stability for the stock market that began with the appointment of Liu Shiyu as the top securities regulator in early 2016 after his predecessor Xiao Gang was blamed for the crash. Under Liu, the stock index climbed 32 percent from the end of February 2016 though its high in January this year.
The latest plunge in Chinese equities will likely increase the appeal of other speculative assets such as property, undermining the government’s efforts to make the stock market a steady base for companies to raise funds.
Delta has moved from Terminal 1 to the new Satellite Terminal (S1) at Shanghai Pudong International Airport. The relocation, alongside partner China Eastern Airlines, will create a more seamless and convenient connecting experience for customers.The second China International Import Expo will be held at the National Exhibition and Convention Center in Shanghai from November 5 to 10, 2019.For further information about China International Import Expo, please visit: https://www.shine.cn/China-International-Import-Expo/.Find the latest breaking shanghai news, photos, videos and featured stories on pudong airport. SHINE provides trusted national and world news as well as local and regional perspectives.

"Delta is committed to continuously investing to improve customers' on-the-ground and in-flight experience," said Wong Hong, Delta's President ¨C Greater China and Singapore. "This move is part of our broader strategy to collaborate with China Eastern to better address the growing needs of the U.S.-China market."
Delta customers departing from and arriving to Shanghai-Pudong will enjoy fast and seamless customs procedures, connections and boarding at S1. Check-in will take place at Terminal 1 with mass rapid transit system transfer to S1 around the clock. Customers will also enjoy s​hopping, dining and entertainment inside the satellite terminal building. China Eastern's new VIP lounges at S1 will be open to Delta One customers and SkyMiles Diamond, Platinum or Gold Medallion members. Moreover, Delta flights arriving at S1 can now park at the gate, so travelers no longer need to bother with remote parking, air stairs or bussing.

Delta operates nonstop daily flights between Shanghai Pudong Airport and four major U.S. gateways, including Detroit, Seattle, Los Angeles and Atlanta. Delta's partnership with China Eastern also gives customers access to over 1,350 codeshare domestic flights per week to more than 40 cities across China. By collocating at S1, Delta and China Eastern will give customers new convenience in both international and domestic connections.

Meanwhile, Delta service from Pudong to Atlanta will transition to the newly retrofitted B777 by early December. By then, all Delta service between Shanghai and the U.S. will be operated by the flagship A350, the new A330-900neo and retrofitted B777, all of which are equipped with next-generation Delta One suite and Delta Premium Select cabins.

The new satellite terminal building, known as S1 and S2, covers 620,000 square meters and is the largest structure of its kind in the world. The sprawling H-shaped terminal has 90 boarding bridges and connects with Terminals 1 and 2 easily via the mass transit system. With the opening of the new satellite terminal, the Shanghai Pudong Airport has the capacity to handle 80 million passengers annually.
Taste of Sichuan, which opened in February in the same mid-State Street spot as Soga Shabu Shabu, has picked up where the former Chinese restaurant left off. It has a similarly expansive menu, shabu shabu (hot pot, cook-your-own) choices, free dessert bar, and Soga’s comfortable, vibrant atmosphere.The second China International Import Expo will be held at the National Exhibition and Convention Center in Shanghai from November 5 to 10, 2019.For further information about China International Import Expo, please visit: https://www.shine.cn/China-International-Import-Expo/.Find the latest breaking shanghai news, photos, videos and featured stories on taste of sichuan. SHINE provides trusted national and world news as well as local and regional perspectives.

Like its predecessor, it also offers a great lunch deal. The restaurant was doing a strong noontime business on my two recent visits, drawing in largely Chinese students and a handful of others for its $9.95 bento box lunch specials.

The 22 choices offer lots of variety, everything from pan-fried pork intestine to General Tso’s chicken. There are also seafood, beef and vegetarian items.The meals come with soup, rice, and a choice between ox tongue and tripe with chili sauce and steamed chicken with chili oil sauce. The chicken had an off-putting taste and smell, and the fat and skin wasn’t cut off. The menu calls it white meat, but it was dark.

Of the four soups, I’ve tried the wonton and egg drop. Both broths were thin on flavor, and with the egg drop soup you could practically taste the cornstarch. The wonton soup’s dumplings redeemed it, but next time I’ll go for the spicy and sour soup or the seafood soup.Seaweed salad was also promised on the menu, but isn’t available. A manager translating for the new owner said that’s a menu mistake. The menu is written in Chinese and English, and the English descriptions can be flawed because most customers are Chinese so they don’t ask about them, she said.

When I opted out of both the tongue and chicken on my second lunch visit, my server offered me a vegetable spring roll, on the menu for $3.95 for two. It was OK, but bland, the vegetable matter inside blending into mush. At least it had a delicate, crisp shell, instead of a doughy one. A bowl of sweet and sour sauce on the side helped.

On my first visit, the four-compartment box came with three fried pork dumplings that were crisp and not greasy.In terms of the main course, I had the best luck with the fish filet with “pickle pepper.” The fish was steamed and served in chunks, which fortunately weren’t breaded. My dining partner said it “melted in her mouth.”Our server told me it was flounder, and it reminded me of the excellent flounder at Asian Sweet Bakery on Park Street. Pickling the chili peppers toned down their heat and gave the dish a slightly sour quality. Thinly-sliced ginger and onions added flavor.

The sesame chicken featured mostly bite-sized pieces of breaded chicken. The sauce had a slight sweetness, which I enjoyed, and the broccoli underneath was saturated in sauce. Sesame seeds on top added visual appeal. A third meal, an oily eggplant with chili sauce, needed more seasoning, despite its chunks of garlic. All three meals were generous and filling.Servers didn’t tell us about the dessert bar in the back room, so it would be a good idea to advertise that fact on the menu. It’s included with all meals and features fortune cookies, almond cookies and less familiar butterfly cookies. Two flavors of Jello, orange slices and not-quite-ripe cantaloupe are also usually available. I left with a renewed interest in almond cookies.

Soga Shabu Shabu was in the same spot on the 500 block for about a year after moving from a second floor location across the street.New owner Ying Xiong Wu, who cooks and manages the kitchen, got into the restaurant business through his best friend, Jin Chen, who with his wife, Aichan “Wendy” Weng, owns and operates Dragon I and Poke Plus & Teriyaki, both on State Street, and Ichiban on Park Street.

Ying, Jin and Aichan are from the southeastern Chinese city of Fuzhou, the capital of China’s Fujian province. The former owner is also from Fuzhou, but the two parties didn’t know each other before the sale.Aichen is helping to run Taste of Sichuan, even though she’s busy with her own restaurants. She spoke for Ying, who doesn’t speak English.

Ying didn’t make any changes to the space, as far as I can tell. For more privacy and quiet, diners can sit in the back room, which has the same roomy red booths as the bright, lively main room.A TV in the front was broadcasting a soap opera with closed captioning and thankfully no sound. American pop music played softly in the background, commercials and all, thanks to local station Magic 98.Ying inherited the food photos and artwork from the former owner. These include generic lighthouse and landscape canvases, as well as scenes of the Capitol and Lambeau Field.

The same location housed the casual pizza and pasta restaurant Mia Za’s for 10 years. When it comes to Chinese food on State Street, there’s a lot of competition, and Taste of Sichuan is in the thick of it.“It’s very hard because so many restaurants open,” Aichan said. “I don’t understand why everyone wants to open a business on State Street for Chinese food right now. It’s almost like China Town.